You Can Buy a Business Without Bank Financing

People wishing to buy a business are often put off by concerns about financing. They don’t have the bucks to pay cash, SBA loans are no longer as available as water at their favorite restaurant, the banks aren’t too friendly in the lending department, the equity in their home has evaporated, and there no rich uncles around to bankroll their dream purchase.

Guess what? People who want to sell their businesses understand that. In fact, a good business broker will explain that very common buyer’s limitation upfront to his seller, before he even lists that business. The business broker will encourage the seller to offer terms-in short, to carry a note for part of the purchase.

And most of them will. I am a business broker in Las Vegas and the thumping majority of my listings have sellers willing to lug some paper on the back end of a sale.

The key to a successful deal is often the nature of the agreement–more particularly, the downpayment and the terms–rather than the selling price. Most people looking to buy a business want to get their downpayment back out of the first year’s profits. Conversely, most people selling their businesses want a downpayment large enough (often around 50%) that the buyer has sunk sufficient cash into the sale to insure that he will do everything possible to keep the business successful enough to pay off the balance. Most deals in which paper is carried accomplish that.

Let’s use an example. Say a service business does a gross of a $140K a year, with a net profit at around $70K. And the seller of the business wants $135K for it. Often the published terms (those stated by the seller in the listing) will go like this: $70K down, remaining over 24 months at 8% interest. Get it? The buyer of the business gets his downpayment back in profits that first year and can then spread out the balance for the next two years.

Read my lips: You don’t have to offer either the price or the terms the seller of the business requests. You maybe want to offer $120K for this enterprise, at $60K down and the rest over 36 months. All things being equal, it is likely a motivated buyer would accept that offer to buy her business.

But what if the buyer wants all cash? If the price is low-under $100k-it may not be much of a problem for most buyers. But even here, you will find business sellers willing to carry small notes.

Whatever you do when buying a business, do not be put off by an all-cash request. If that business has been perched on the listing system for awhile getting limited interest, the seller of the business may well swallow hard and accept a sale with terms.

Business buyers listen up: Don’t be put off by selling prices and fears over rustling up the money. That is not the place to start. First, find a business that you find attractive-financially and otherwise. Just look for something that catches your eye. Once you hit it, then look at price and terms. It may be affordable right there. In any case, if you have a broker of any value representing you, talk it over with him as frankly as you would present a matter to your lawyer. He may well be able to help you put together a reasonable offer. It might be conventional or even rather creative. It doesn’t matter. After perhaps a little dickering back and forth, you may get a deal.

And if you do, that’s all that matters. You have taken the first step toward realizing the dream of owning your own business.

Find Small Business Grant Programs

Currently commercial uncertainty is gripping the country and unemployed numbers are rising. Most households are struggling to preserve their wealth. There are many entrepreneurs who are opening their personal companies in a bid to take control of their financial well-being. One of the most daunting obstacles all young companies are confronted with is start-up resources. Start-up money is a must in starting to get any young venture profitable and there are a couple ways to procure it.

To procure funding some organizations will receive funds from a bank or investment group. Both these methods have substantial issues.

Taking advantage of bank loans to fund your starting business can provide adequate funding, however recent crises in the domestic monetary industry has made borrowing money more difficult. Being given funds almost always means speaking to banks with zero assurance of funding and having to pay back the borrowed funds in the future.

Taking on other principles means locating a fellow entrepreneur or company with a background in your business model and ceding them an ownership stake for funding. Opening your growing business with funds from investors necessitates you may not own the entirety of your venture. The benefit of this source is that the funding is not reimbursed like a loan.

Government programs are an alternative choice for obtaining funds for your growing company. New business grants dispense money for supporting recent commercial companies to get on the road to success. The recent financial stimulus bill provides greater amounts of cash available for every areas of municipal funding initiatives. The cash is never required to be reimbursed and can be a very important help for a new business. Requesting a municipal new stimulus funds can be exasperating however. All public grant application forms are hard to understand and the money are released to accepted petitions.

Often understanding the details of  application forms for stimulus grants can be difficult fortunately there are resources available. These resources including tools and expert advice will help you completely learn the process and take advantage of the system to be awarded public money.

A Small Business Loan

A small business loan is one of the most treasured commodities in the business world. It is still very hard to get despite the claims and promises of banks, credit unions, and other lending institutions that they want to help American small business to survive and grow. In fact it sometimes seems that banks and other lenders want to see small businesses fail and only support those that survive the battle for customers, revenues, and finances during their first two years.

Getting a small business loan is most difficult during these first two years, when most businesses face a myriad of challenges involved with not only opening their doors, but hiring and training staff and meeting the demands of customers, clients, suppliers and vendors. The main reason that the banks use for not granting many loans during this period is like the same reason that a student can’t get a job coming out of school. They don’t have the experience.

The other major reason behind that first reason is that the banks think that many small businesses are simply too great a risk to offer them a small business loan. On that front they do have a point. The majority of small businesses open and close their doors for good during that first year and from the banks’ perspective they don’t want to risk losing their investment during this period.

But after a small business survives those first two years of struggle the banks are much more accommodating. By then the business not only has experience and has proven its capacity to overcome adversity, it also has a track record of being in business. This will include having a financial statement or income tax return prepared twice as well as a record of how well they have been paying their bills to other businesses, suppliers and vendors.

The banks are able to access this information by doing a business credit check from any one of a number of business credit reporting agencies. They can also access a company’s payment record by reviewing their Paydex Score which is available from business reporting company, Dun and Bradstreet. Whenever there is an application for a small business loan, all lenders will review this information before even looking at the rest of the loan application.

If all the business credit checks and reports come back okay the banks and other lending institutions may look further into the business requesting a small business loan and this often includes a personal financial check on the owners or operators of the company. They may ask for business references to follow up with and they may even ask for a personal guarantee or collateral before granting a small business loan.

Agencies like the Small Business Administration can assist small businesses to obtain a small business loan since almost all of the monies provided to small businesses are guaranteed by them even before the bank loosens up its money strings.