Invoice Factoring and Accounts Receivable Financing for Small Business

Small Businesses are still suffering from a lack of available capital for expansion, purchase of new equipment and for just making payroll until a client pays.

First a little background. Factoring, or the act of selling invoices at a discount, is a financial product that has been available since the birth of merchant and customers. There are many factors in the world and many focus on specific industries or even segments within industries. Like Temporary Staffing, Trucking, Software Developers, Coders, Oil and Gas services and more.

Accounts Receivable financing, another name for Factoring, requires a small business owner to sell an invoice for an advance against that invoice. The factor will typically provide an advance of between 70-95% of the face value of the invoice depending on a few things. First, the strength of the Account Debtor or the person that owes the small business money, for a service or product. The Account Debtor is typically another business.

The process for starting to factor is much like obtaining a commercial bank loan or home loan, expect that Factors will work with clients who aren’t bankable or able to secure financing from a traditional community bank, credit union, or national bank. A basic application is completed and information is provided for the underwriting of the invoice and client. These documents will usually include the businesses financials, information on the account debtor, a background check, and documents related to the invoice, contracts, purchase order and more.

Once all the documents are gathered the factor will complete its due diligence and underwrite and quote factoring the invoice. The underwriter will also recommend a term for factoring, since you will be putting your future invoices up for security in the event the invoice doesn’t pay, or some other calamity prevents the payment of the factored invoice.

Factoring can be expensive, and it can also be very reasonable. When comparing the cost of financing, merchant advance loans, credit cards, and other typical small business financing, factoring may actually be a bit cheaper. Again the cost to factor is based on the risk and likelihood the invoice will pay the factor. The cost is also determined by the credit, collateral, character of the small business requesting the factoring.

The easiest way to look at factoring is figuring its cost on a monthly basis. It’s not uncommon for a factor to offer very attractive rates or at least advertise them online .35% to5.55% but the reality is those are 10 day rates or something near that. A typical factor will charge between 1.5% for the highest quality factor to over 5% for risky invoices that have a higher risk profile.