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You Can Buy a Business Without Bank Financing

People wishing to buy a business are often put off by concerns about financing. They don’t have the bucks to pay cash, SBA loans are no longer as available as water at their favorite restaurant, the banks aren’t too friendly in the lending department, the equity in their home has evaporated, and there no rich uncles around to bankroll their dream purchase.

Guess what? People who want to sell their businesses understand that. In fact, a good business broker will explain that very common buyer’s limitation upfront to his seller, before he even lists that business. The business broker will encourage the seller to offer terms-in short, to carry a note for part of the purchase.

And most of them will. I am a business broker in Las Vegas and the thumping majority of my listings have sellers willing to lug some paper on the back end of a sale.

The key to a successful deal is often the nature of the agreement–more particularly, the downpayment and the terms–rather than the selling price. Most people looking to buy a business want to get their downpayment back out of the first year’s profits. Conversely, most people selling their businesses want a downpayment large enough (often around 50%) that the buyer has sunk sufficient cash into the sale to insure that he will do everything possible to keep the business successful enough to pay off the balance. Most deals in which paper is carried accomplish that.

Let’s use an example. Say a service business does a gross of a $140K a year, with a net profit at around $70K. And the seller of the business wants $135K for it. Often the published terms (those stated by the seller in the listing) will go like this: $70K down, remaining over 24 months at 8% interest. Get it? The buyer of the business gets his downpayment back in profits that first year and can then spread out the balance for the next two years.

Read my lips: You don’t have to offer either the price or the terms the seller of the business requests. You maybe want to offer $120K for this enterprise, at $60K down and the rest over 36 months. All things being equal, it is likely a motivated buyer would accept that offer to buy her business.

But what if the buyer wants all cash? If the price is low-under $100k-it may not be much of a problem for most buyers. But even here, you will find business sellers willing to carry small notes.

Whatever you do when buying a business, do not be put off by an all-cash request. If that business has been perched on the listing system for awhile getting limited interest, the seller of the business may well swallow hard and accept a sale with terms.

Business buyers listen up: Don’t be put off by selling prices and fears over rustling up the money. That is not the place to start. First, find a business that you find attractive-financially and otherwise. Just look for something that catches your eye. Once you hit it, then look at price and terms. It may be affordable right there. In any case, if you have a broker of any value representing you, talk it over with him as frankly as you would present a matter to your lawyer. He may well be able to help you put together a reasonable offer. It might be conventional or even rather creative. It doesn’t matter. After perhaps a little dickering back and forth, you may get a deal.

And if you do, that’s all that matters. You have taken the first step toward realizing the dream of owning your own business.

Business Letters – The Different Types of Business Letters

All business letters are written to make something happen. They either inform or seek information or action. A business letter that doesn’t seek action is a non-letter and should never have been written.

This article discusses the main types of business letters and their purposes:

Letters of Transmission

These letters, also called “cover” letters accompany something that is being sent to someone and explain why and from whom the item is being sent. For example, when a company’s annual report is distributed, it is usually accompanied by a letter of transmission highlighting several key points in the report and informing recipients that the report is enclosed or attached.

Letters that Inform

As the title suggests, these letters are intended to inform recipients about something. If you have a mortgage, you may have received a letter from your financial institution advising you that your interest rate has increased. This is a common example of a letter that informs.

Requests and Responses to Requests

Businesses write to individuals or businesses requesting a variety of things or events. These letters of request are usually responded to with letters of response.

Letters of Offer and Acceptance

When a person applies for a job and is successful, he or she usually receives a letter of offer outlining the terms and conditions of the job. Letters of Offer are also used for contracts. When a person accepts an offer, a letter of acceptance is used.

Sales Letters

Everyone knows what a sales letter is, they need no explanation. If you are like me, you receive far too many of them.

Condolence Letters

These aren’t common, but occasionally businesses send letters of condolence to spouses of employees who die, whose family members die, or who otherwise run into a sad or difficult time in their lives.

Conclusion

The interesting thing about letters is that each has a different way of being written depending on it’s purpose. All should have the three common elements; an opening paragraph explaining what the letter is about, the body with full details, and an action ending asking for something to happen.

When I receive a letter written by someone who has completed a business communication course, I can tell within seconds. Most of the other letters I receive are mediocre at best or poor at worst.

If you are in the business of writing business letters, reports or other documents and haven’t studied business communication, I strongly suggest you enrol at the earliest or at least read some of the other articles I have written about business communication.

Invoice Factoring and Accounts Receivable Financing for Small Business

Small Businesses are still suffering from a lack of available capital for expansion, purchase of new equipment and for just making payroll until a client pays.

First a little background. Factoring, or the act of selling invoices at a discount, is a financial product that has been available since the birth of merchant and customers. There are many factors in the world and many focus on specific industries or even segments within industries. Like Temporary Staffing, Trucking, Software Developers, Coders, Oil and Gas services and more.

Accounts Receivable financing, another name for Factoring, requires a small business owner to sell an invoice for an advance against that invoice. The factor will typically provide an advance of between 70-95% of the face value of the invoice depending on a few things. First, the strength of the Account Debtor or the person that owes the small business money, for a service or product. The Account Debtor is typically another business.

The process for starting to factor is much like obtaining a commercial bank loan or home loan, expect that Factors will work with clients who aren’t bankable or able to secure financing from a traditional community bank, credit union, or national bank. A basic application is completed and information is provided for the underwriting of the invoice and client. These documents will usually include the businesses financials, information on the account debtor, a background check, and documents related to the invoice, contracts, purchase order and more.

Once all the documents are gathered the factor will complete its due diligence and underwrite and quote factoring the invoice. The underwriter will also recommend a term for factoring, since you will be putting your future invoices up for security in the event the invoice doesn’t pay, or some other calamity prevents the payment of the factored invoice.

Factoring can be expensive, and it can also be very reasonable. When comparing the cost of financing, merchant advance loans, credit cards, and other typical small business financing, factoring may actually be a bit cheaper. Again the cost to factor is based on the risk and likelihood the invoice will pay the factor. The cost is also determined by the credit, collateral, character of the small business requesting the factoring.

The easiest way to look at factoring is figuring its cost on a monthly basis. It’s not uncommon for a factor to offer very attractive rates or at least advertise them online .35% to5.55% but the reality is those are 10 day rates or something near that. A typical factor will charge between 1.5% for the highest quality factor to over 5% for risky invoices that have a higher risk profile.