How To Add An Official Business Page On Facebook

1. Log onto your Facebook account. (You must have an active Facebook account to create a Page of any kind – whoever creates the page is the administrator).

2. Go to ‘Account’ (top right), ‘Help Center’ (second from the bottom), ‘Facebook Applications and Features’ (second category listed), ‘Pages for Businesses’ (last item in that section).

3. A new page will pop up, search for, or choose the link to ‘How Can I Create a Page?’ Another page will come up, click the link that says ‘here’.

4. Choose the type of Page you will be creating:
• Local Business
• Brand, Product, or Organization
• Artist, Band or Public Figure

5. Once you have selected the type of Page, choose the best subcategory shown in the drop-down list, and then name your Page. For example, if you are a restaurant, you would enter the name of your restaurant as the Page name.

6. Check the box agreeing that you are an official representative of this business, and then click the box that says, ‘Create Page’. (A box will pop up, read carefully and agree before continuing).

7. Once you have created the page you may add photos, business information, post comments and links on your wall. Facebook will take you through the appropriate steps to complete your business profile.

8. Once all of your Page information is entered you must remember to publish the Page or it will be unavailable for fans to search for.

9. You now need to start a fan base: Click ‘Suggest to Friends’ to invite your personal Facebook friends, or email the Page link to your businesses client list inviting them to like your Page.

10. Make sure someone is monitoring the Page, wall and communicating with your fans on a regular basis. (Some businesses request help with these services).

Good luck with your social media endeavors!

3 Tests To Qualify For A Small Business Loan

Banks and other lenders are really only concerned about one thing; getting repaid.

After all, that is how they still make the bulk of their revenue; making loans and getting repaid both interest and principal.

Thus, to qualify for a business loan, you simply have to demonstrate that your business can service the loan request – meaning being able to make the loan payments for the life of the loan.

Most lenders will perform the following 3 analysis calculations to determine if your business has the cash flow to service the proposed new loan.

1) Spread The Financials:

Banks / lenders will require three years of past financial statements at a minimum. The reason is to see if your business could have serviced the loan over the last three years. If it passes this test, then your business should be able to service the loan for the next three years.

Thus, they use your past business performance to determine what your future performance should be.

To spread your financial, most lenders will do the following for each past period that your business provided financial statements:

  • Take your net income (that is your net profits after all operating costs, taxes and interest payments).
  • Add back any non-cash accounting items like depreciation (deprecation is not an ongoing cash expenses but an accounting anomaly to reduce taxable income for tax reporting purposes only).
  • Add back any one-time charges or expenses – expenses that are not expected to reoccur in the future.
  • Then subtract out the interest charges for the proposed loan – only the interest portion at this stage as interest payments are considered regular business expenses.

This results in the true net positive (hopefully positive) cash flow of the business – cash flow that will be used to pay the principal portion of the business loan.

Now, if your business’s cash flow at this point can cover the principal portion of the loan, you have almost pasted this test.

Most lenders will not just want to see if your business’s cash flow meets the minimum principal portion of the proposed loan but would like it to cover 25% or even 50% more. The reason is that should your business have a slow period and revenues decline by say 25% or 50% – your business’s cash flow would still be sufficient to make the loan payment.

Example: Your business requests a $100,000 loan for three years with a monthly payment of $3,227 – broken down as interest of $449 and principal of $2,778.

Therefore, your monthly cash flow should not only cover the $2,778 in principal but say 1.25 times more or $3,473.

Also, keep in mind that this cash flow figure should not only cover the proposed loan’s principal but the principal payments of all the business loans the company has.

Principal payments are not income statement items and are not accounted for based on normal operating income and expenses but are balance sheet items and are paid out of net income (after all operating expenses).

Interest charges from loans are an operating expense and accounted for when the financials are spread.

Financials could be spread monthly, quarterly or even annually – depending on the types of financial statements requested or the policies of the lending institution.

If you can past this test via your past business performance, then it is highly expected that your business will do the same in the near future.

2) What If Scenarios:

Here, the lender will perform a series of “what if” scenarios on your financial statements.

For example, they may take your total revenue per period and reduce it by 10% or 20% – keeping all other items (your expenses) the same.

Then, spread those numbers again to see if your business could still service the proposed loan – e.g. still have the cash flow to make the payments.

Again, reassuring the bank or lender that your business would still be able to repay them should your business hit a slow period.

3) Debt-to-Equity Ratio:

Lastly, while your business may be able to service the proposed loan’s payments, banks also want to ensure that your business is not over leveraged – meaning that your business does not have too much debt in comparison to its equity.

Let’s say that the entire market declines or crashes and your revenues fall so low that you are forced to shut down the business. In this situation, would you still be able to repay all your lenders – including this proposed loan?

Thus, lenders look to a safety measure known as the debt-to-equity ratio.

Measuring your debt-to-equity is simply taking your Total Liabilities and dividing them by your company’s total equity.

The higher this ratio, the more risk the business has as it is relying on too much outside debt financing.

A ratio over 3 (meaning that the business has three times the debt as it does equity) is too much risk for most lenders to feel comfortable with.

Most businesses will have a debt-to-equity ratio between 1.5 to 2 and are considered safe to their prospective lender.

Now, if your business does not pass all these tests with flying colors and you still need a small business loan to grow, then it is up to you (the business owner) to manage your company in such a way to bring your business in line with these tests.

It all starts with your understanding of your business and the measures it has to pass to qualify.

Small Business Accounting Explained

Below we give you some tips on how to make small business accounting more bearable for you.

First, you should make a list of all accounting tasks to perform in your business. Once you have your list, small business accounting is less stressful and takes less time. You will only have to perform one or more tasks at regular intervals (daily, weekly, monthly …).

We also recommend that if do not know a lot about small business accounting, learn the basics.

Small business accounting is a specific jargon and all sorts of words and concepts reserved for the experts. Do not be discouraged if you do not understand them all. Get used to the most basic concepts directly related to successfully improving your small business accounting. Ultimately, the goal is that you increase profit. It is the primary goal of any business. Request help from a professional if you want, but do not miss the basic concepts.

In contrast, it is a mistake to become a super fan of small business accounting. The company does not come down to accounting. There are firms and professionals who do this very well. This is not the job of an entrepreneur to be a know-it-all of Management or Accounting.

The third golden advice is to separate your personal finances from your business finances.

It is a bad idea to mix your personal account and your business account. Separate them completely: even if you’re the sole shareholder in the company, even if only your money is put into the pot. This separation enables you to plan, predict, without confusing personal cash and professional cash. This allows a lucid view of the true accounts of the company.

Finally, you must be consistent.

It may be hard to get used to at first but we recommend that once you create an accounting system for you, you should stick to it no matter what. Remember to register everything, forget nothing, and be consistent. If you are not consistent you will start doubting your own system later which will not help you when you want to evaluate your business performance at the end of the year. It is a good idea to meet with your accountant to have him or her verify the information.